Friday, October 7, 2011
Postpartum (Food) Delivery in Oakland Chinatown
Wish this food service was available in other major centres, would be so popular with new mums who want to be treated to the benefits of Asian healing foods.

Allan Liu and his family started the company in recent months to cater (literally) to the booming younger generation who are having babies left and right, it seems. They are employing Allan’s mother, the “Liu Mama" of the company’s namesake, to cook everything, plus two additional kitchen staffers. They’ve rented out the Oakland Asian Cultural Center’s commercial kitchen, centrally located in Oakland’s Chinatown.
For 30 days after giving birth, they deliver healthful meals (beginning with hospital deliveries if the births are in hospitals) to the new mother’s doorsteps .

Sources: Hyphen Magazine, Liu Mama

Postpartum (Food) Delivery in Oakland Chinatown

Wish this food service was available in other major centres, would be so popular with new mums who want to be treated to the benefits of Asian healing foods.

Allan Liu and his family started the company in recent months to cater (literally) to the booming younger generation who are having babies left and right, it seems. They are employing Allan’s mother, the “Liu Mama" of the company’s namesake, to cook everything, plus two additional kitchen staffers. They’ve rented out the Oakland Asian Cultural Center’s commercial kitchen, centrally located in Oakland’s Chinatown.

For 30 days after giving birth, they deliver healthful meals (beginning with hospital deliveries if the births are in hospitals) to the new mother’s doorsteps .

Sources: Hyphen MagazineLiu Mama

Thursday, September 22, 2011
The Conrad Hotels Campaign: The Luxury of Being Smug

Let me describe the image of a recent Conrad Hotels print ad campaign I came across in  The Atlantic: Two stocky, grey-haired, and shabbily dressed Asian ladies chopping a pile of fish in what looks to be a murky Hong Kong street market, while standing next to them are two young Caucasian models — bowls of noodles in hand — who looked inexplicably pleased … with themselves. The copy reads: “The Luxury of Being Yourself.”
What exactly does this ad tell me about luxury? As far as I can tell, it’s that well-dressed white people can instantly grasp that elusive “luxury” when placed in an environment that makes their physical features and designer clothes stand out. And what kind of “Being Yourself” activity is portrayed? Noodle eating, in a rather blasé manner?

What do you think of this ad? Offensive or harmless?

The Conrad Hotels Campaign: The Luxury of Being Smug

Let me describe the image of a recent Conrad Hotels print ad campaign I came across in  The Atlantic: Two stocky, grey-haired, and shabbily dressed Asian ladies chopping a pile of fish in what looks to be a murky Hong Kong street market, while standing next to them are two young Caucasian models — bowls of noodles in hand — who looked inexplicably pleased … with themselves. The copy reads: “The Luxury of Being Yourself.”

What exactly does this ad tell me about luxury? As far as I can tell, it’s that well-dressed white people can instantly grasp that elusive “luxury” when placed in an environment that makes their physical features and designer clothes stand out. And what kind of “Being Yourself” activity is portrayed? Noodle eating, in a rather blasé manner?

What do you think of this ad? Offensive or harmless?

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

My Summer at an Indian Call Center

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Lessons learned: Americans are hotheads, Australians are drunks—and never say where you’re calling from.

— By Andrew Marantz

(white) American guy Andrew Marantz is a freelance writer who spent a summer at an Indian call centre.

Monday, June 27, 2011

How I was treated on the subway when I was doing fieldwork as a migrant worker

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Tricia Wang is doing ethnographic research in China and here’s an excerpt of her story when she rode the subway dressed as a migrant worker.

When we sat down on the empty seat, I accidentally lightly brushed my backpack against the man sitting to my left. I immediately apologized.  But he didn’t respond, he just looked alarmed that I had touched him and gave me a glaring look that told me immediately that I shouldn’t even be sitting near him. He wiped off the part of his arm that my bag had brushed as if I had dumped dirt on his suit.

His action alone made me super conscious of my physical condition -  the dirt on my toes, my oily face, and my blackened clothing from working with food vendors. I hadn’t showered in two days and that’s all I kept thinking after he looked at me.  I glanced around around and saw people staring at us. I immediately made a boundary in my head and called them “city people.” As Yang Jie kept talking, I kept noticing the “city people” in their daily showered bodies, freshly washed clothing, and dirt-free toes.

I then received a text message so I pulled my phone out. I immediately noticed the man next to me look at me curiously - he saw that I not only had a smartphone, but probably what looked like a real iphone (it is a real iphone). I texted back to my friend in English, and this is when he became super aware that something was off - it’s hard to explain the look on his face, but he just kept looking over my shoulder as if his eyeballs were going to pop out. He then looked at  Yang Jie up and down and then at me up and down.

It angered me that I could feel his judgement seeping onto me, and I could feel that the minute he saw me texting in English his level of disdain at me decrease. Texting in English in combination with owning an iphone are signifiers of an education and he picked up on it immediately.

I saw the man’s face change when he saw me pull my iphone; so the big contrast between how I was dressed and the technology that I owned was something that didn’t make sense to him within this context.

I tried to imagine how would I see the world if I experienced this every single time I got on the train. Would I become bitter, would I form over-arching categories about “city” people so that I could make sense of how I was treated, would I essentialize anyone who looked like they were well dressed or showered?

Source: Bytes of China

Monday, June 20, 2011

So excited about Bollywood’s IIFA Awards

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I got inspired by Ms. Kitty’s Manish Malhotra post.

Yet I am really conflicted because of the contrast with Kim Longinotto's Pink Saris.

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(Source: picasaweb.google.com)

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Mulan the Amazon  vs Yarnbombed Paper Tiger

Fight Choreography, Art Direction & Photography by KahoKarl

Monday, May 30, 2011 Saturday, April 30, 2011 Friday, April 8, 2011
Cultural Stereotypes Through the Lens of Google Search [Screenshots]
Source: Voxy

Cultural Stereotypes Through the Lens of Google Search [Screenshots]

Source: Voxy

Friday, April 1, 2011 Friday, March 25, 2011 Thursday, March 24, 2011
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