Wednesday, March 9, 2011
United at Tables in Harlem

THERE were four elderly black women in hats at Red Rooster Harlem the other night, across the aisle from a group of white men who had come north to 125th Street by subway. Also present were a mixed-race family sharing apple pie, a stroller beside them; an Asian same-sex couple, drinking wine; and mixed-gender black couples eating Swedish meatballs. Above them all was a Philip Maysles painting depicting the artist Norman Rockwell staring into a mirror and painting a portrait of himself — as Ruby Bridges, the African-American girl who integrated an all-white elementary school in New Orleans in 1960.

Read More: The New York Times

United at Tables in Harlem

THERE were four elderly black women in hats at Red Rooster Harlem the other night, across the aisle from a group of white men who had come north to 125th Street by subway. Also present were a mixed-race family sharing apple pie, a stroller beside them; an Asian same-sex couple, drinking wine; and mixed-gender black couples eating Swedish meatballs. Above them all was a Philip Maysles painting depicting the artist Norman Rockwell staring into a mirror and painting a portrait of himself — as Ruby Bridges, the African-American girl who integrated an all-white elementary school in New Orleans in 1960.

Read More: The New York Times

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